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A Mississippi mother who raised her two children with the help of a popular parenting concept talks about how it has shaped her family’s life.

Laynah Rose Crawley, who calls herself “The Fun Homeschool Mom” ​​on Instagram, said she first heard the term “nanny” from Seattle-based mom Susie Allison, who wrote about it on her blog, “The Busy Toddler.”

“As soon as I heard her say it, she gave me permission not to intervene with my children,” Crawley told Fox News Digital.

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“And it was like, ‘Oh, (this) opens up a whole new world for me.'”

“Sittervising” is a combination of the words “sitting” and “supervising.” A blog post by Allison titled “Why You’ll Find Me Babysitting” has attracted attention from parents online since it was published in 2022.

Byran and Benjamin playing

Two children play together without parents bothering them or interfering. A Mississippi mother has become a big proponent of the parenting trend known as nannying after she heard about it from a blogger. (Laynah Rose Crawley)

Crawley described the method as “allowing children to play independently in the same room as you without (parents) getting involved in their play.

The way Crawley has incorporated nannying into her life over the years has evolved, she said, as her two children have grown.

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Crawley became a mother of two in 2018 when she adopted a toddler just months after giving birth to a son.

coloring bryan

Shown here is one of Crawley’s young sons, Bryan. The mother describes babysitting as allowing “the children to play independently in the same room as you without (parents) getting involved in their play. (Laynah Rose Crawley)

“I didn’t know what to do with a toddler and I didn’t know what to do with a newborn, so it was like a double first for me,” Crawley said.

They were so demanding for good reason. There are so many activities that we have to participate in. And then when I realized that playing was something I couldn’t intervene in, it was a defining moment.”

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When her children were 3 and 2 years old, Crawley began working as a babysitter to teach them independence.

It also gave him the opportunity to rest for a period of time.

She would play with them for five or ten minutes to establish a form of connection, an “emotional need” that Crawley highlights among her parenting methods.

Benjamin playing in the house.

Crawley lets her children play alone without adult intervention and she will take the opportunity to do chores around the house. Crawley’s son Benjamin is shown here playing with a toy cash register. (Laynah Rose Crawley)

After playing with them for a while, Crawley steps back as the children continue playing alone.

He also noted that the environment will change over time as the children grow.

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“There’s a quote I love that says, ‘Control the environment, free a child.’ You can care for someone anywhere and at any age, as long as there are safety measures or a contained space.”

With independence comes freedom, Crawley said, and babysitting allows children to play in fun and creative ways beyond the boundaries adults can construct.

Bryan playing outside

“There’s a quote I love that says, ‘Control the environment, free a child.’ You can care for someone anywhere and at any age, as long as there are safety measures or a contained space.” (Laynah Rose Crawley)

“They’re creating their own rules and societies, and they’re learning a lot about the game when an adult isn’t involved.”

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Allowing her children to experience some freedom and independence has been worth it, Crawley said, as she has noticed more confidence and creativity in them along with improvement in speech and social skills.

Bryan with goats

Babysitting promotes confidence in both children and parents, one mother said. Children feel comfortable when parents begin to trust their little ones’ decisions. (Laynah Rose Crawley)

When her children were younger, she became “exhausted” regularly, she said, and that’s partly why she began using babysitting techniques.

Crawley said she feels like a “big kid mom” now that her sons, Bryan, 6, and Benjamin, 5, have grown up a bit.

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“There’s more distance and they have more space,” he said. “They can even go to the neighbor’s house and I can see them in the front yard out the window.”

“So I guess babysitting has been taking on more and more space as they build their confidence and I build my trust in them, knowing that they’re not getting into trouble.”

Crawley family on the beach

Crawley. In the photo with her family on the beach, she said she loved watching her children gain confidence over time. (Photography by Annie Cooper/@anniecooper.photography)

Don Grant, PhD, a psychologist, researcher and national advisor for Healthy Device Management at Newport Healthcare in Los Angeles, California, told Fox News Digital that he thinks babysitting could be helpful for parents who need a break from time to time. .

Parents should also be aware of the importance of attachment theory, he said.

Crawley family photos

“There’s a quote I love that says, ‘Control the environment, free a child.’ You can care for someone anywhere and at any age, as long as there are safety measures in place,” Crawley said. (Photography by Annie Cooper/@anniecooper.photography)

“This just lets your child see that you are there,” she said. “This is very important, especially in those early years of building attachment.”

“It is important that your child can register.”

“They’re thriving academically. They’re thriving physically and emotionally. And working as nannies is just another way for them to thrive.”

-Laynah Rose Crawley

Grant said babysitting should encompass more than just a parent sitting close to their child but not aware of what they are doing; Parents should be observant and prepared to intervene in a situation if necessary.

When children look up, “all they need is reassurance,” he said. “This creates a very strong and secure bond.”

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He added: “And if the child looks up even if it’s just to check that you’re still there, you make eye contact and smile.”

Grant agreed that working as a nanny can promote independence, as parents allow children to be creative and imaginative on their own.

Crawley Family Photo Session

Crawley, shown with her family, calls herself “The Fun Homeschool Mom” ​​on Instagram. (Photography by Annie Cooper/@anniecooper.photography)

Crawley said he has enjoyed watching his children grow up in independent play.

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“I love seeing them thrive in every way,” she said.

babysitter taking care of divided children

Crawley’s two sons are shown when they were a little younger. “There are so many activities we have to participate in,” she said of parenting. “And then when I realized that playing was something I couldn’t intervene in, it was a defining moment.” (Laynah Rose Crawley)

“They are thriving academically. They are thriving physically and emotionally,” he said.

“And babysitting is just another way to thrive.”

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By Sam